Burt Lancaster. Famous people in English. Personajes famosos en inglés.

Burt Lancaster Biography:

Burt Lancaster (1913-1994), one of the most popular film stars of all times, never wanted to be an actor.

Rugged, athletic, and handsome, Burt Lancaster enjoyed phenomenal success from his first film, The Killers, to his last, Field of Dreams — over a career spanning more than four decades. Boasting an impressively wide range, he delivered thoughtful, sensitive performances across a spectrum of genres: from film noir to Westerns to melodrama, he commanded the screen with a presence and power matched by only a handful of stars.

Lancaster was born November 2, 1913, in New York City. As a child, he exhibited considerable athletic and acrobatic prowess, and at the age of 17 joined a circus troupe, forming a duo with the diminutive performer Nick Cravat (later to frequently serve as his onscreen sidekick). He eventually joined the army, and, after acting and dancing in a number of armed forces revues, he decided to pursue a dramatic career. Upon hiring an agent, Harold Hecht, Lancaster made his Broadway debut in A Sound of Hunting, a role which led to a contract with Paramount. Because the release of his first picture, Desert Fury, was delayed, he initially came to the attention of audiences in 1946’s The Killers, a certified classic of film noir. It remained the genre of choice in several of his subsequent projects, including 1947’s Brute Force and I Walk Alone the following year.

After starring as Barbara Stanwyck’s cheating husband in Sorry, Wrong Number, Lancaster and his manager formed their own production company, Hecht-Lancaster, the first notable star-owned venture of its kind; more were to follow, and they contributed significantly to the ultimate downfall of the old studio system. Its formation was a result of Lancaster’s conscious effort to avoid “beefcake” roles, instead seeking projects which spotlighted his versatility as a performer. While the company’s first effort, the war melodrama Kiss the Blood Off My Hands, was not a success, they were nonetheless able to secure enough financial backing to break off completely from the mainstream Hollywood system. Still, Lancaster also continued to appear in studio productions. In 1949, he reunited with The Killers director Robert Siodmak at Universal for another excellent noir, Criss Cross, followed by Rope of Sand. He also signed a non-exclusive contract with Warner Bros., where he and Hecht produced 1950’s The Flame and the Arrow, a swashbuckler which was his first major box-office success.

After producing Ten Tall Men with Hecht, Lancaster starred in the MGM Western Vengeance Valley, followed by the biopic Jim Thorpe — All American. With Siodmak again directing, he next headlined the 1952 adventure spoof The Crimson Pirate, followed by Daniel Mann’s Come Back, Little Sheba opposite Oscar-winner Shirley Booth. A minor effort, South Sea Woman, followed in 1953 before Lancaster starred in the Fred Zinnemann classic From Here to Eternity, earning him a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his performance and, in his beachside rendezvous with co-star Deborah Kerr, creating one of the most indelible images in film history. Another swashbuckler, His Majesty O’Keefe, followed, and under director Robert Aldrich the actor headlined a pair of Westerns, Apache and Vera Cruz. Finally, in 1955, Lancaster realized a long-held dream and helmed his own film, The Kentuckian; reviews were negative, however, and he did not return to the director’s chair for another two decades.

Again working with Mann, Lancaster co-starred with another Oscar winner, Anna Magnani, in 1955’s The Rose Tattoo. Opposite Tony Curtis, he appeared in the 1956 hit Trapeze, and, with Katherine Hepburn, headlined The Rainmaker later that same year. Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, a blockbuster featuring Lancaster as Wyatt Earp, followed, as did the acclaimed The Sweet Smell of Success. With Clark Gable, Lancaster starred in 1958’s Run Silent, Run Deep, followed by Separate Tables. For 1960’s Elmer Gantry, he won an Academy Award for his superb portrayal of the title character, a disreputable evangelist, and a year later co-starred in Judgment at Nuremberg. Under John Frankenheimer, Lancaster next portrayed The Birdman of Alcatraz, earning Best Actor honors at the Venice Film Festival for his sympathetic turn as prisoner Robert Stroud, an expert in bird disease. For John Cassavetes, he starred in 1963’s A Child Is Waiting, but the picture was the victim of studio interference and poor distribution.

Around the same time, Italian filmmaker Luchino Visconti was trying to secure financing for his planned historical epic Il Gattopardo (aka The Leopard), and needed to cast an international superstar in the lead role; Lancaster actively campaigned for the part, and delivered one of the strongest performances of his career. Released in 1963, it was a massive success everywhere but in the U.S., where it was brutally edited prior to release. After two hit movies with Frankenheimer, the 1964 political thriller Seven Days in May and the 1965 war drama The Train, Lancaster starred in another Western, The Hallelujah Trail, followed by the 1966 smash The Professionals. A rare series of flops — The Swimmer, Castle Keep, and The Gypsy Moths — rounded out the decade, but by 1970 he was back at the top of the box office with Airport. Still, Lancaster’s star was clearly dimming, and he next appeared in a pair of low-budget Westerns, Lawman and Valdez Is Coming. After an underwhelming reunion with Aldrich, 1972’s Ulzana’s Raid, he attempted to take matters into his own hands, writing and directing 1974’s The Midnight Man in collaboration with Roland Kibbee, but it failed to attract much attention, either.

For Visconti, Lancaster next starred in 1975’s Gruppo di Famiglia in un Interno. Remaining in Europe, he also appeared in Bernardo Bertollucci’s epic 1900. Neither resuscitated his career, nor did Robert Altman’s much-panned Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson. Lancaster languished in a number of television projects before appearing in 1978’s Go Tell the Spartans, which, despite critical acclaim, failed to catch on. In 1980, however, he delivered a stunning turn as an aging gangster in Louis Malle’s excellent Atlantic City, a performance which earned him Best Actor honors from the New York critics as well as another Oscar nomination. Also highly acclaimed was his supporting role in the 1983 Bill Forsyth gem Local Hero. Heart trouble sidelined him for all of 1984, but soon Lancaster was back at full steam, teaming one last time with Kirk Douglas for 1986’s Tough Guys. Several more TV projects followed before he returned to feature films with 1988’s little-seen Rocket Gibraltar and the 1989 blockbuster Field of Dreams. In 1991, Lancaster made his final appearance in the telefilm Separate But Equal. He died October 20, 1994.

 

 

 

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Pearl S. Buck tres poemas cortos. Poesías escogidas en inglés. Traducción al español.

Pearl S. Buck. Fue una escritora estadounidense, ganadora del Premio Nobel de Literatura en 1938.

Pearl S. Buck tres poemas cortos.
Essence by Pearl S. Buck.

I give you the books I’ve made,
Body and soul, bled and flayed.
Yet the essence they contain
In one poem is made plain,
In one poem is made clear:
On this earth, though far or near,
without love there’s only fear.

Pretense Pearl S. Buck.

I put away the words of love.
You do not need them anymore.
And now I will pretend to be
Exactly as I was before.
Pretending, I will laugh and sing
Until night falls. Then to my shell
I’ll creep and hide myself away,
Pretending heaven in my hell.

Desire Pearl S. Buck.

The slow rise, the swelling joy,
Filling vein and pulse until
Desire, flooding to its full height
Breaks — as breaks the wave upon the sea.
then I am you, love, and
You are me.

 

Las traducciones (libres) al español solamente pretenden traducir el significado literal (aproximado) de los poemas:

Esencia de Pearl S. Buck
Te doy los libros que hice,
Cuerpo y alma, sufridos y desgarrados.
Sin embargo, la esencia que contienen
En un poema se hace simple,
En un poema se aclara:
En esta tierra, aunque lejos o cerca,
sin amor solo hay miedo.

Pretensión de Pearl S. Buck
Descarto las palabras de amor.
Ya no las necesito más.
Y ahora pretenderé ser
Exactamente como era antes.
Fingiendo, me reiré y cantaré
Hasta que caiga la noche. Luego a mi caparazón
Me arrastraré y me esconderé,
Fingiendo el cielo en mi infierno.

Deseo de Pearl S. Buck
El lento ascenso, la alegría aumentada,
llenando la vena y el pulso hasta
el deseo, inundando en toda su magnitud
Se rompe – como rompe la ola sobre el mar.
entonces yo soy tú, amor, y
Tú eres yo.

 

Pearl Comfort Sydenstricker Buck nació en Hillsboro, Virginia Occidental; 26 de junio de 1892 y murió en Danby, Vermont; 6 de marzo de 1973 fue una escritora estadounidense, ganadora del Premio Nobel de Literatura en 1938. Pasó la mitad de su vida en China, donde la llevaron sus padres misioneros con tres meses de edad y donde vivió unos cuarenta años a lo largo de su vida. Es conocida por el apellido de su primer marido, Buck; su apellido de soltera era Sydenstricker.

Biografía

Pearl Comfort Sydenstricker nació en Hillsboro (Virginia Occidental), Estados Unidos), el 26 de junio de 1892. Sus padres —Absalom y Caroline Sydenstricker— eran misioneros presbiterianos establecidos en China. Pearl fue la cuarta de siete hijos y una de los únicos tres que llegaron a la edad adulta. Nació mientras sus padres estaban en Estados Unidos, y cuando tenía tres meses de edad volvió con ellos a China, en la que pasó casi cuarenta años, acumulados en distintos periodos de su vida. La familia vivía en Chinkiang, en la provincia de Kiangsu. Su padre pasaba largos meses fuera de casa en misión, mientras que su madre predicaba a las mujeres del pueblo en un pequeño dispensario que ella misma había abierto.

Desde la niñez, Pearl hablaba inglés y mandarín. Fue educada principalmente por su madre y un tutor chino, el señor Kung. Durante 1900 la familia tuvo que mudarse a Shanghái, y poco tiempo después marcharon a Estados Unidos para establecer un nuevo hogar.

En 1919 conoció al economista en agricultura John Lossing Buck con quien se casó y se estableció en Nan Suzhou. Su primera hija, Carol, nació en 1921; víctima de una enfermedad sufrió retraso mental severo. Durante el parto se le detectó a Pearl un tumor de útero, por el que tuvo que someterse a una histerectomía. En 1925 la pareja adoptó a una bebé, Janice. El matrimonio fue infeliz desde el comienzo, pero duró casi dieciocho años. Desde 1920 hasta 1933 la familia vivió en Nanking, en el campus de la universidad de la ciudad, en la que ambos enseñaban. En 1921 murió la madre de Pearl y pronto su padre se mudó con Pearl y su marido. Las tragedias consecuentes desde 1920 que afectaron a Pearl tuvieron su epítome en 1927 en el Incidente de Nankín. En una batalla en la que participaron tropas nacionalistas, elementos de Chiang Kai-shek, fuerzas comunistas y varios occidentales, resultaron asesinadas muchas personas. Los Buck pasaron el día escondiéndose hasta que los rescataron hombres estadounidenses. Se mudaron por un año a Japón y luego volvieron a Nanking, donde las condiciones aún eran peligrosas.

En 1938 obtuvo el Premio Nobel de Literatura. Pearl murió en marzo de 1973, a los ochenta y un años de edad. Su tumba está en Green Hills Farm.

Obra

Escribió más de ochenta y cinco libros, muchos de los cuales son novelas que ofrecen un retrato amable de China y su gente. De su estancia en el empobrecido pueblo de Nanhsuchou, Pearl sacó la semilla que la llevaría a escribir The Good Earth y otras historias de China. Su producción literaria abarca géneros tan dispares como el relato, el teatro, el guion cinematográfico, la poesía, la literatura infantil, la biografía y hasta un libro de cocina. Su estilo sencillo y directo, y su preocupación por los valores fundamentales de la vida humana, tienen su origen en el estudio de la novela china.

En 1920 comenzó a publicar sus historias y ensayos en revistas como Nation, The Chinese Recorder, Asia y Atlantic Monthly. Su primera novela, Viento del este, viento del oeste fue publicada por la editorial John Day en 1930. El ejecutivo de esta compañía, Richard Walsh, se convirtió en el segundo esposo de Pearl en 1935, después de que ésta y John Lossing Buck se divorciaron. En 1931 la misma compañía publicó La buena tierra, que se convirtió en el libro más vendido en 1931 y 1932, ganó el premio Pulitzer y la Medalla Howells en 1935, y además fue adaptado a una película de la MGM en 1937. En 1938, menos de diez años después de publicar su primer libro, Pearl ganó el Premio Nobel de Literatura; así se volvió la primera mujer norteamericana sobre la que recayó dicho galardón. Entre sus obras posteriores cabe mencionar La estirpe del dragón (1942), Los Kennedy (1970) y China tal y como yo la veo (1970). En el momento de su muerte en 1973, llevaba publicados más de setenta libros que comprenden novelas, colecciones de historias, biografías, autobiografías, poesía, drama, literatura infantil y traducciones del chino.

En 1934 se mudó de forma permanente a los Estados Unidos donde, junto a Walsh, su esposo, compró la granja Green Hills Farm, en el Condado de Bucks, Pasadena, que ahora es parte del registro de Edificios Históricos del país, y que visitan más de quince mil personas cada año. También adoptaron seis niños más.

Desde el día en que pisó tierra estadounidense, Buck fue activista por los derechos civiles y de la mujer. Siguió publicando ensayos: en Crisis (el diario de NAACP) y en Opportunity (la revista de la Liga Urbana), y durante veinte años trabajó en la Universidad Howard. En 1942 ella y su marido fundaron la Asociación East and West, dedicada al intercambio cultural y el entendimiento entre Asia y Occidente. En 1949 fundó la Welcome House, la primera agencia de adopción en la que se aceptaban niños asiáticos y mestizos. En 1964 estableció la fundación Pearl S. Buck, que proveía de atención a niños asiático-estadounidenses que no eran elegibles para adopción, y que también benefició a cientos de niños en varios países de Asia.

Obras

  • Viento del Este, viento del Oeste (East Wind, West Wind, 1929)

  • La buena tierra (The Good Earth, 1931) Trilogía de la familia Wang, vol.1, con la que obtendría el premio Pulitzer

  • The Young Revolutionist (La joven revolucionaria, 1931. Publicada también con el título Un revolucionario en China, 1950)

  • Hijos (Sons, 1932) Trilogía de la familia Wang, vol.2

  • The First Wife (La primera esposa, 1933)

  • La madre (The Mother, 1934)

  • Un hogar dividido (A House Divided, 1935) Trilogía de la familia Wang, vol.3

  • El ángel luchador (Fighting Angel, 1936)

  • This Proud Heart (Este orgulloso corazón, 1938)

  • The Patriot (El patriota, 1939)

  • Otros dioses (Other Gods, 1940)

  • La estirpe del dragón (Dragon Seed, 1942)

  • La promesa (The Promise, 1943)

  • El dragón mágico (The dragon fish, 1944)

  • Retrato de un matrimonio (Portrait of a Marriage, 1945)

  • Pavilion of Women (Pabellón de mujeres, 1946)

  • Peonía (Peony, 1948)

  • Kinfolk (Los parientes, 1949)

  • The Child Who Never Grew (El niño que nunca creció, 1950)

  • Un día feliz (One bright day, 1950)

  • Hombres de Dios (Men of God, 1951)

  • La flor escondida (The Hidden Flower, 1952)

  • Brillante desfile (Bright Procession, 1952)

  • Come, My Beloved (Ven amada mía, 1953)

  • My Several Worlds: A Personal Record (Mis diversos mundos, 1954)

  • La Gran Dama (Imperial Woman, 1956)

  • Carta de Pekín (Letter from Peking, 1957)

  • A Bridge for Passing (Puente de paso, 1962)

  • Bambú (El cañaveral viviente) (The Living Reed, 1963)

  • Con cierto aire delicado (Fourteen Stories, 1963)

  • Death in the Castle (Muerte en el castillo, 1964)

  • The New Year (El año nuevo, 1968)

  • Las tres hijas de madame Liang (The three daughters of madame Liang, 1969)

  • China como la he visto (1971), libro de memorias

  • El último gran amor (The Goddess Abides, 1972)

  • Yu Lan, el niño aviador de China (1973)

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New Rules. Dua Lipa. Letra en inglés y video. Traducción al español. Selección de canciones en inglés.

New Rules – Dua Lipa

Dua Lipa nació en Londres, Inglaterra, el 22 de agosto de 199.

Es una cantante, compositora y modelo británica de ascendencia albano-kosovar.

Su sencillo Be the One, de 2015, lanzó su carrera a nivel internacional, tras ingresar entre las primeras veinte posiciones en las listas de éxitos musicales en varios países europeos y en Australia. Su single New Rules, alcanzó el número 1 en las listas británicas.

Se llevó los premios Brit Awards a mejor artista británica y mejor artista revelación. Nominada a la canción del año en los MTV Video Music Awards 2018.

 

 Vídeo de la canción “New Rules” de Dúa Lipa:

New Rules

One, one, one…

Talkin’ in my sleep at night
Makin’ myself crazy
(Out of my mind, out of my mind)
Wrote it down and read it out
Hopin’ it would save me
(Too many times, too many times)
My love, he makes me feel like nobody else
Nobody else
But my love, he doesn’t love me, so I tell myself
I tell myself

One, don’t pick up the phone
You know he’s only calling ‘cause he’s drunk and alone
Two, don’t let him in
You’ll have to kick him out again
Three, don’t be his friend
You know you’re gonna wake up in his bed in the morning
And if you’re under him, you ain’t getting over him

I got new rules, I count ‘em
I got new rules, I count ‘em
I gotta tell them to myself
I got new rules, I count ‘em
I gotta tell them to myself

I keep pushin’ forwards, but he keeps pullin’ me backwards
(Nowhere to turn) no way
(Nowhere to turn) no
Now I’m standing back from it, I finally see the pattern
(I never learn, I never learn)
But my love, he doesn’t love me, so I tell myself
I tell myself
I do, I do, I do

One, don’t pick up the phone
You know he’s only calling ‘cause he’s drunk and alone
Two, don’t let him in
You’ll have to kick him out again
Three, don’t be his friend
You know you’re gonna wake up in his bed in the morning
And if you’re under him, you ain’t getting over him

I got new rules, I count ‘em
I got new rules, I count ‘em
I gotta tell them to myself
I got new rules, I count ‘em
I gotta tell them to myself

Practice makes perfect
I’m still tryna’ learn it by heart
(I got new rules, I count ‘em)
Eat, sleep, and breathe it
Rehearse and repeat it, ‘cause I
(I got new, I got new, I…)

One, don’t pick up the phone
You know he’s only calling ‘cause he’s drunk and alone
Two, don’t let him in
You’ll have to kick him out again
Three, don’t be his friend
You know you’re gonna wake up in his bed in the morning
And if you’re under him, you ain’t getting over him

I got new rules, I count ‘em
I got new rules, I count ‘em
(Oh, whoa-oh)
I gotta tell them to myself
I got new rules, I count ‘em
(Baby, you know I count ‘em)
I gotta tell them to myself

Don’t let him in, don’t let him in
Don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t
Don’t be his friend, don’t be his friend
Don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t
Don’t let him in, don’t let him in
Don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t
Don’t be his friend, don’t be his friend
Don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t
You gettin’ over him

Nuevas Reglas

Uno, uno, uno…

Hablando en mi sueño por la noche
Volviéndome loca a mí misma
(Fuera de mi mente, fuera de mi mente)
Lo escribí y lo leí
Esperando que esto me salvaría
(Demasiadas veces, demasiadas veces)
Mi amor, él me hace sentir como nadie más
Nadie más
Pero mi amor, él no me ama, así que me digo a mí misma
Me digo a mí misma

Uno, no contestes el teléfono
Sabes que solo llama porque está ebrio y solo
Dos, no le dejes entrar
Tendrás que echarle a patadas de nuevo
Tres, no seas su amiga
Sabes que despertarás en su cama por la mañana
Y si estás debajo de él, no le olvidarás

Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento
Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento
Tengo que decírmelas a mí misma
Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento
Tengo que decírmelas a mí misma

Tengo que empujar hacia adelante, pero él continúa tirándome hacia atrás
(Ningún lugar a donde girar) no hay camino
(Ningún lugar a donde girar) no
Ahora estoy reponiéndome de esto, finalmente veo el patrón
(Nunca aprendo, nunca aprendo)
Pero mi amor, él no me ama, así que me digo a mí misma
Lo hago, lo hago, lo hago

Uno, no contestes el teléfono
Sabes que solo llama porque está borracho y solo
Dos, no le dejes entrar
Tendrás que echarle a patadas de nuevo
Tres, no seas su amiga
Sabes que despertarás en su cama por la mañana
Y si estás debajo de él, no le olvidarás

Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento
Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento
Tengo que decírmelas a mí misma
Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento
Tengo que decírmelas a mí misma

La práctica lo hace perfecto
Aún estoy tratando de aprenderlo de memoria
(Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento)
Como, duermo, y lo respiro
Ensayo y lo repito, porque yo
(Tengo nuevas, tengo nuevas, yo…)

Uno, no contestes el teléfono
Sabes que solo llama porque está borracho y solo
Dos, no lo dejes entrar
Tendrás que echarle a patadas de nuevo
Tres, no seas su amiga
Sabes que despertarás en su cama por la mañana
Y si estás debajo de él, no le olvidarás

Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento
Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento
(Oh, whoa-oh)
Tengo que decírmelas a mí misma
Tengo nuevas reglas, las cuento
(Bebé, sabes que las cuento)
Tengo que decírmelas a mí misma

No lo dejes entrar, no lo dejes entrar
No, no, no, no
No seas su amiga, no seas su amiga
No, no, no, no
No lo dejes entrar, no lo dejes entrar
No, no, no, no
No seas su amiga, no seas su amiga
No, no, no, no
Lo estás olvidando

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John Lennon. Famous people in English. Personajes famosos en inglés.

John Lennon Biography

John Lennon was born on October 9, 1940, in Liverpool, England. He met Paul McCartney in 1957 and invited McCartney to join his music group. They eventually formed the most successful songwriting partnership in musical history. Lennon left the Beatles in 1969 and later released albums with his wife, Yoko Ono, among others. On December 8, 1980, he was killed by a crazed fan named Mark David Chapman.

Famed singer-songwriter John Winston Lennon was born on October 9, 1940, in Liverpool, Merseyside, England, during a German air raid in World War II.

When he was four years old, Lennon’s parents separated and he ended up living with his Aunt Mimi. Lennon’s father was a merchant seaman. He was not present at his son’s birth and did not see a lot of his son when he was young.

Lennon’s mother, Julia, remarried, but visited him and Mimi regularly. She taught Lennon how to play the banjo and the piano and purchased his first guitar. Lennon was devastated when Julia was fatally struck by a car driven by an off-duty police officer in July 1958. Her death was one of the most traumatic events in his life.

As a child, Lennon was a prankster and he enjoyed getting into trouble. As a boy and young adult, he enjoyed drawing grotesque figures and cripples. Lennon’s school master thought that he could go to an art school for college, since he did not get good grades in school but had artistic talent.

McCartney introduced George Harrison to Lennon the following year, and Harrison and art college buddy Stuart Sutcliffe also joined Lennon’s band. Always in need of a drummer, the group finally settled on Pete Best in 1960.

The first recording they made was Buddy Holly’s “That’ll Be the Day” in 1958. In fact, it was Holly’s group, the Crickets, that inspired the band to change its name. Lennon would later joke that he had a vision when he was 12 years old – a man appeared on a flaming pie and said unto them, “From this day on, you are Beatles with an ‘A.'”

The Beatles were discovered by Brian Epstein in 1961 at Liverpool’s Cavern Club, where they were performing on a regular basis. As their new manager, Epstein secured a record contract with EMI. With a new drummer, Ringo Starr (Richard Starkey), and George Martin as producer, the group released their first single, “Love Me Do,” in October 1962. It peaked on the British charts at No. 17.

Lennon wrote the group’s follow-up single, “Please Please Me,” inspired primarily by Roy Orbison, but also fed by Lennon’s infatuation with the pun in Bing Crosby’s famous lyrics, “Oh, please, lend your little ears to my pleas,” from the song “Please.” The Beatles’ “Please Please Me” topped the charts in Britain. The Beatles went on to become the most popular band in Britain with the release of such mega-hits as “She Loves You” and “I Want To Hold Your Hand.”

Lennon married Cynthia Powell in August 1962. The couple had one son together, Julian, who was named after Lennon’s mother. Cynthia was forced to keep a very low profile during Beatlemania. She and Lennon divorced in 1968. He remarried the following year, on March 20, 1969, to Japanese avant-garde artist Yoko Ono, whom he had met at the Indica Gallery in November 1966.

In 1964, the Beatles became the first British band to break out big in the United States, beginning with their appearance on television’s The Ed Sullivan Show on February 9, 1964. Beatlemania launched a “British Invasion” of rock bands in the United States that also included the Rolling Stones and the Kinks. Following their appearance on Sullivan, the Beatles returned to Britain to film their first film, A Hard Day’s Night (1964), and prepare for their first world tour.

The Beatles’ second film, Help!, was released in 1965. That June, Queen Elizabeth II of England announced that the Beatles would be named a Member of the Order of the British Empire. In August 1965, the foursome performed to 55,600 fans at New York’s Shea Stadium, setting a new record for largest concert audience in musical history. When the Beatles returned to England, they recorded the breakthrough album Rubber Soul (1965), noted for extending beyond the love songs and pop formulas for which the band was previously well-known.

The magic of Beatlemania had begun to lose its appeal by 1966. The band members’ lives were put in danger when they were accused of snubbing the presidential family in the Philippines. Then, Lennon’s remark that the band was “more popular than Jesus now” incited denunciations and Beatles record bonfires in the U.S. Bible belt. The Beatles gave up touring after an August 29, 1966, concert at San Francisco’s Candlestick Park.

After an extended break, the band returned to the studio to expand their experimental sound with drug-influenced exotic instrumentation/lyrics and tape abstractions. The first sample was the single “Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields Forever,” followed by the album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), considered by many to be the greatest rock project in musical history.

The Beatles then suffered a huge blow when Epstein died of an accidental overdose of sleeping pills on August 27, 1967. Shaken by Epstein’s death, the Beatles retrenched under McCartney’s leadership in the fall and filmed Magical Mystery Tour. While the film was panned by critics, the soundtrack album contained Lennon’s “I Am The Walrus,” the group’s most cryptic work yet.

Magical Mystery Tour failed to achieve much commercial success, and the Beatles retreated into Transcendental Meditation and the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, which took them to India for two months in early 1968. Their next effort, Apple Corps Ltd., was plagued by mismanagement. That July, the group faced its last notably hysterical crowd at the premiere of their film Yellow Submarine. In November 1968, the Beatles’ double-album The Beatles (also known as The White Album) displayed their divergent directions.

By this time, Lennon’s artist partnership with second wife Yoko Ono had begun to cause serious tensions within the group. Lennon and Ono invented a form of peace protest by staying in bed while being filmed and interviewed, and their single “Give Peace a Chance” (1969), recorded under the name “the Plastic Ono Band,” became a national anthem of sorts for pacifists.

Lennon left the Beatles in September 1969, just after the group completed recording Abbey Road. The news of the break-up was kept secret until McCartney announced his departure in April 1970, a month before the band released Let It Be, recorded just before Abbey Road.

Not long after the Beatles broke up, in 1970, Lennon released his debut solo album, John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band, featuring a raw, minimalist sound that followed “primal-scream” therapy. He followed that project with 1971’s Imagine, the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed of all Lennon’s post-Beatles efforts. The title track was later named No. 3 on Rolling Stone magazine’s “All-Time Best Songs” list.

Peace and love, however, was not always on Lennon’s agenda. Imagine also included the track “How Do You Sleep?,” a vehement response to veiled messages at Lennon in some of McCartney’s solo recordings. The friends and former songwriting duo later buried the hatchet, but never formally worked together again.

Lennon and Ono moved to the United States in September 1971, but were constantly threatened with deportation by the Nixon Administration. Lennon was told that he was being kicked out of the country due to his 1968 marijuana conviction in Britain, but the singer believed that he was being removed because of his activism against the unpopular Vietnam War. Documents later proved him correct. (Two years after Nixon resigned, in 1976, Lennon was granted permanent U.S. residency.)

In 1972, while battling to stay in America, Lennon performed at Madison Square Garden in New York City to benefit mentally handicapped children and continued to promote peace. His immigration battle took a toll on Lennon’s marriage, and in the fall of 1973, he and Ono separated. Lennon went to Los Angeles, California, where he partied and took a mistress, May Pang. He still managed to release hit albums, including Mind Games (1973), Walls and Bridges (1974) and Rock ‘n’ Roll (1975). During this time, Lennon famously collaborated with David Bowie and Elton John.

Lennon and Ono reconciled in 1974, and she gave birth to their only child, a son named Sean, on Lennon’s 35th birthday (October 9, 1975). Shortly thereafter, Lennon decided to leave the music business to focus on being a father and husband.

In 1980, John Lennon returned to the music world with the album Double Fantasy, featuring the hit single “(Just Like) Starting Over.” Tragically, just a few weeks after the album’s release, Mark David Chapman, a deranged fan, shot Lennon several times in front of his apartment complex in New York City. Lennon died at New York City’s Roosevelt Hospital on December 8, 1980, at the age of 40.

John Lennon’s assassination had, and continues to have, a profound impact on pop culture. Following the tragic event, millions of fans worldwide mourned as record sales soared. And Lennon’s untimely death still evokes deep sadness around the globe today, as he continues to be admired by new generations of fans. Lennon was posthumously inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1987, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994.

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Mighty River de Mary J. Blige. Letra en inglés y video. BIOGRAFIA BREVE. DISCOGRAFIA. FOTOS.

La canción Mighty River tuvo nominaciones al Oscar a la mejor canción original y al Premio Globo de Oro a la Mejor Canción Original.

 

Mighty River de Mary J. Blige

Life is a teacher, time is a healer
And I’m a believer like a river wild
Ego’s a killer, greed is a monster
But love is stronger, stronger than them all

[Pre-Chorus]
White flag in hand, I don’t wanna fight
No lines in the sand, I’m on your side
Invisible, no colour life
It’s time we put our, put our, put our differences aside

[Chorus]
Time tells no lies
It keeps changing, and ticking, and moving, then passes by
But if you’re lucky, it will be kind
Like a river flowing through time

[Post-Chorus]
(Like a river) let it wash you clean
(Mighty river) going up stream
(Like a river) cutting through right
(Mighty river) ‘cause it never gives up
(Like a river) so full of life
(Mighty river) liquid like time
(Like a river) let it wash away
(Mighty river) the pain from yesterday

[Verse 2]
Love is the answer, hate is a cancer
Hope of forgiveness, it waters the soul
Our blood is red, we’re not so different
‘Cause underneath our skin we’re identical

[Pre-Chorus]
White flag in hand, we’re not gonna fight
No lines in the sand, I’m on your side
Invisible, no colour life, oh
It’s time we put our, oh, put our differences aside
We know wrong from right

[Chorus]
Oh, time tells no lies
He keeps changing, and ticking, and moving, then passes by
But if you’re lucky, it will be kind
Oh, like a river flowing through time, oh

[Post-Chorus]
(Like a river) let it wash you clean
(Mighty river) going up stream
(Like a river) cutting through right
(Mighty river) ‘cause it never gives up
(Like a river) so full of life
(Mighty river) liquid like time
(Like a river) let it wash away
(Mighty river) the pain from yesterday
(Like a river) oh, oh, oh
(Mighty river) rain down on me
(Like a river) all it takes is time
(Mighty river) to heal this bloodline
(Like a river) better wash me clean
(Mighty river) get this dirt off of me, yeah
(Like a river) oh, oh, oh
(Mighty river) let it wash the pain
Oh, oh, oh yeah
(Like a river) oh, like a river
(Mighty river) mighty and better river
(Like a river) oh yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
(Mighty river) let it wash away
(Like a river) oh, oh, oh
(Mighty river) oh, all the hurt and pain
(Like a river) oh yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
(Mighty river) oh mighty river, mighty river.

 

Mary Jane Blige nació en Nueva York, el 11 de enero de 1971.

Es una actriz y cantante estadounidense de R&B contemporáneo, de soul y hip-hop. Ganadora de 9 premios Grammy.

Influida por Chaka Khan, Aretha Franklin y Anita Baker.

La canción Mighty River tuvo nominaciones al Oscar a la mejor canción original y al Premio Globo de Oro a la Mejor Canción Original.

 

Discografía

2016: “Strength of a Woman”

2014: The London Sessions

2011: My Life II… The Journey Continues (Act 1)

2009: Stronger With Each Tear

2007: Growing Pains

2005: The Breakthrough

2003: Love & Life

2001: No More Drama

1999: Mary

1997: Share My World

1994: My Life (álbum de Mary J. Blige)

1992: What’s The 411?

1990: Goodbye World

1989: Pain Goodbye

1987: Watering Plans

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CURSOS DE INGLES EN MADRID.

Calle Princesa, 70 1º

28008 Madrid

Teléfono – 915433139

paraninfo@paraninfo.com

 

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Mickey Rooney. Famous people in English. Personajes famosos en inglés.

Mickey Rooney Biography.

Mickey Rooney was born Joe Yule Jr. on September 23, 1920 in Brooklyn, New York, and took the stage as a toddler in his parents’ vaudeville act at 17 months old. He made his first film appearance in 1926. The following year, he played the lead character in the first Mickey McGuire short film. It was in this popular film series that he took the stage name Mickey Rooney. Rooney reached new heights in 1937 with A Family Affair, the film that introduced the country to Andy Hardy, the popular all-American teenager. This beloved character appeared in nearly 20 films and helped make Rooney the top star at the box office in 1939, 1940, and 1941. Rooney also proved himself an excellent dramatic actor as a delinquent in Boys Town starring Spencer Tracy. In 1938, he was awarded a juvenile Academy Award.

Teaming up with Judy Garland, Rooney also appeared in a string of musicals, including Babes in Arms (1939)–the first teenager to be nominated for an Oscar in a leading role–Strike up the Band (1940), Babes on Broadway (1941), and Girl Crazy (1943). He and Garland immediately became best of friends. “We weren’t just a team, we were magic,” Rooney once said. During that time, he also appeared with Elizabeth Taylor in the now classic National Velvet (1944). Rooney joined the service that same year, where he helped to entertain the troops and worked on the American Armed Forces Network. He returned to Hollywood after 21 months in Love Laughs at Andy Hardy (1946), did a remake of a Robert Taylor film, The Crowd Roars called Killer McCoy (1947), and portrayed composer Lorenz Hart in Words and Music (1948). He also appeared in Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), starring Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard. Rooney played Hepburn’s Japanese neighbor, Mr. Yunioshi. A sign of the times, Rooney played the part for comic relief, which he later regretted feeling the role was offensive. He once again showed his incredible range in the dramatic role of a boxing trainer with Anthony Quinn and Jackie Gleason in Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962). In the late 1960s and 1970s Rooney showed audiences and critics alike why he was one of Hollywood’s most enduring stars. He gave an impressive performance in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1979 film The Black Stallion, which brought him an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor. He also turned to the stage in 1979 in Sugar Babies with Ann Miller and was nominated for a Tony Award. During that time, he also portrayed the Wizard in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz with Eartha Kitt at New York’s Madison Square Garden, which also had a successful run nationally.

Rooney appeared in four television series: The Mickey Rooney Show (1954-1955), a comedy sit-com in 1964 with Sanunee Tong called Mickey, One of the Boys in 1982 with Dana Carvey and Nathan Lane, and the Adventures of the Black Stallion from 1990-1993. In 1981, Rooney won an Emmy Award for his portrayal of a mentally challenged man in Bill. The critical acclaim continued for the veteran performer, with Rooney receiving an honorary Academy Award “in recognition of his 60 years of versatility in a variety of memorable film performances.” More recently, he appeared in such films as Night at the Museum (2006) with Ben Stiller, and The Muppets (2011) with Amy Adams and Jason Segel.

Rooney’s personal life, including his frequent trips to the altar, proved to be just as epic as his on-screen performances. His first wife was one of the most beautiful women in Hollywood, actress Ava Gardner. Mickey permanently and legally separated from his eighth wife Jan in June of 2012. In 2011, Rooney filed elder abuse and fraud charges against stepson Christopher Aber and Aber’s wife. At Rooney’s request, the Superior Court issued a restraining order against the Abers, demanding that they stay 100 yards from Rooney, Mickey’s stepson Mark Rooney, and Mark’s wife Charlene. Just prior, Rooney had mustered the strength to break his silence and appeared before the Senate in Washington D.C. telling of his own heartbreaking story of abuse in an effort to live a peaceful, full life and help others who may also be suffering in silence.

Rooney requested through the Superior Court to permanently reside with his son Mark (a musician) and Charlene Rooney (an artist) in the Hollywood Hills. Ironically, after eight failed marriages, he never looked or felt better and finally found happiness in the single life. Rooney passed away April 6, 2014 at the age of 93.

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Biografía de Ingrid Bergman. Famous people in English. Personajes famosos en inglés.

Ingrid Bergman Biography

Famed for her saintly, natural beauty, Ingrid Bergman was the most popular actress of the 1940s; admired equally by audiences and critics, she enjoyed blockbuster after blockbuster — until an unprecedented scandal threatened to destroy her career.

Born August 29, 1915, in Stockholm, Sweden, Bergman was only two years old when her mother died; her father passed on a decade later, and the spinster aunt who had become her guardian perished only a few months after that. Her inheritance allowed her to study at Stockholm’s Royal Dramatic Theatre, and in 1934 she made her screen debut after signing to Svenskfilmindustri with a small role in Munkbrovregen. Bergman’s first lead performance followed a year later in Brunninger, and with the success of the 1936 melodrama Valborgsmassoafen, she rose to become one of Sweden’s biggest stars. Later that year, she starred in the romance Intermezzo, which eventually made its way to New York where it came to the attention of producer David O. Selznick.

After signing a Hollywood contract, she relocated to America where her first film, 1939’s Intermezzo: A Love Story, was an English-language remake of her earlier success.
Bergman’s fresh-scrubbed Nordic beauty set her squarely apart from the stereotypical movie starlet, and quickly both Hollywood executives and audiences became enchanted with her. After briefly returning to Sweden to appear in 1940’s Juninatten, Selznick demanded she return to the U.S., but without any projects immediately available he pointed her to Broadway to star in Liliom. Bergman was next loaned to MGM for 1941’s Adam Had Four Sons, followed by Rage in Heaven. She then appeared against type as a coquettish bad girl in the latest screen adaptation Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. However, it was 1942’s Casablanca which launched her to superstardom; cast opposite Humphrey Bogart after a series of other actresses rejected the picture, she was positively radiant, her chemistry with Bogart the stuff of pure magic. Now a major box-office draw, she won the coveted lead in 1943’s For Whom the Bell Tolls with the blessing of the novel’s author, Ernest Hemingway; when her performance earned an Academy Award nomination, every studio in town wanted to secure her talents.


Bergman next starred in Sam Wood‘s Saratoga Trunk, but because the studio, Warner Bros., wanted to distribute more timely material during wartime, the picture’s release was delayed until 1944. As a result, audiences next saw her in Gaslight, starring opposite Charles Boyer; another rousing success, her performance won Best Actress honors from both the Oscar and Golden Globe voters. The 1945 Spellbound, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, was another massive hit, and a year later they reunited for Notorious. Sandwiched in between was The Bells of St. Mary’s, and all told, the three pictures helped push Bergman to the position of Hollywood’s top female box-office attraction.

Upon fulfilling her contract with Selznick, she began freelancing, starring as a prostitute in 1948’s Arch of Triumph; the public, however, reacted negatively to her decision to play against type, and later that year she was even more saintly than usual as the title heroine in Joan of Arc. Expected to become a blockbuster, the film performed to only moderate success, and after a similarly tepid response to the 1949 Hitchcock thriller Under Capricorn, she began to reconsider her options.
Like so many viewers around the world, Bergman had been highly moved by director Roberto Rossellini‘s Italian neorealist masterpiece Roma Citta Aperta; announcing her desire to work with him, she accepted the lead in 1950’s Stromboli.

During production, Bergman and Rossellini fell in love, and she became pregnant with his child; at the time, she was still married to her first husband, Swedish doctor Peter Lindstrom, and soon she was assailed by criticism the world over. After divorcing Lindstrom, Bergman quickly married Rossellini, but the damage was already done: Stromboli was banned in many markets, boycotted by audiences in others, and despite much curiosity, it was a box-office disaster. Together, over the next six years, the couple made a series of noteworthy films including Europa ’51, Siamo Donne, and Viaggio in Italia, but audiences wanted no part of any of them; to make matters worse, their marriage was crumbling, and their financial resources were exhausted. In 1956, Bergman starred in Jean Renoir‘s lovely Elena et les Hommes, but it too failed to return her to audience favor.


Few stars of Bergman’s magnitude had ever suffered such a sudden and disastrous fall from grace; even fewer enjoyed as remarkable a comeback as the one she mounted with 1957’s Anastasia, a historical tale which not only proved successful with audiences but also with critics, resulting in a second Academy Award. For director Stanley Donen, Bergman next starred in 1958’s Indiscreet, followed by The Inn of the Sixth Happiness. Also in 1958, she married for the third time, to Swedish impresario Lars Schmidt, and when a series of planned projects failed to come to fruition she simply went on sabbatical, appearing in a television presentation of The Turn of the Screw in 1959 but otherwise keeping out of the public eye for three years. She resurfaced in 1961 with Aimez-Vous Brahms? Another three-year hiatus followed prior to her next feature project, The Visit. After 1965’s The Yellow Rolls Royce, Bergman appeared in the 1967 Swedish anthology Stimulantia and then turned to the stage, touring in a production of Eugene O’Neill‘s More Stately Mansions.


Bergman’s theatrical success re-ignited Hollywood’s interest, and Columbia signed her to star in 1969’s hit Cactus Flower; 1970’s Spring Rain followed, before she returned to stage for 1971’s Captain Brassbound’s Conversion. After winning a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her work in 1974’s Murder on the Orient Express, Bergman appeared opposite Liza Minnelli in 1976’s A Matter of Time before returning to Sweden to star in 1978’s superb Herbstsonate, the first and only time she worked with her namesake, the legendary director Ingmar Bergman. After penning a 1980 autobiography, Ingrid Bergman: My Story, in 1982, she starred in the television miniseries A Woman Called Golda, a biography of the Israeli premier Golda Meir; the performance was her last — on August 29 of that year she lost her long battle with cancer. In subsequent years, her daughter, Isabella Rossellini, emerged as a top actress and fashion model.

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