Mickey Rooney. Famous people in English. Personajes famosos en inglés.

Mickey Rooney Biography.

Mickey Rooney was born Joe Yule Jr. on September 23, 1920 in Brooklyn, New York, and took the stage as a toddler in his parents’ vaudeville act at 17 months old. He made his first film appearance in 1926. The following year, he played the lead character in the first Mickey McGuire short film. It was in this popular film series that he took the stage name Mickey Rooney. Rooney reached new heights in 1937 with A Family Affair, the film that introduced the country to Andy Hardy, the popular all-American teenager. This beloved character appeared in nearly 20 films and helped make Rooney the top star at the box office in 1939, 1940, and 1941. Rooney also proved himself an excellent dramatic actor as a delinquent in Boys Town starring Spencer Tracy. In 1938, he was awarded a juvenile Academy Award.

Teaming up with Judy Garland, Rooney also appeared in a string of musicals, including Babes in Arms (1939)–the first teenager to be nominated for an Oscar in a leading role–Strike up the Band (1940), Babes on Broadway (1941), and Girl Crazy (1943). He and Garland immediately became best of friends. “We weren’t just a team, we were magic,” Rooney once said. During that time, he also appeared with Elizabeth Taylor in the now classic National Velvet (1944). Rooney joined the service that same year, where he helped to entertain the troops and worked on the American Armed Forces Network. He returned to Hollywood after 21 months in Love Laughs at Andy Hardy (1946), did a remake of a Robert Taylor film, The Crowd Roars called Killer McCoy (1947), and portrayed composer Lorenz Hart in Words and Music (1948). He also appeared in Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), starring Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard. Rooney played Hepburn’s Japanese neighbor, Mr. Yunioshi. A sign of the times, Rooney played the part for comic relief, which he later regretted feeling the role was offensive. He once again showed his incredible range in the dramatic role of a boxing trainer with Anthony Quinn and Jackie Gleason in Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962). In the late 1960s and 1970s Rooney showed audiences and critics alike why he was one of Hollywood’s most enduring stars. He gave an impressive performance in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1979 film The Black Stallion, which brought him an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor. He also turned to the stage in 1979 in Sugar Babies with Ann Miller and was nominated for a Tony Award. During that time, he also portrayed the Wizard in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz with Eartha Kitt at New York’s Madison Square Garden, which also had a successful run nationally.

Rooney appeared in four television series: The Mickey Rooney Show (1954-1955), a comedy sit-com in 1964 with Sanunee Tong called Mickey, One of the Boys in 1982 with Dana Carvey and Nathan Lane, and the Adventures of the Black Stallion from 1990-1993. In 1981, Rooney won an Emmy Award for his portrayal of a mentally challenged man in Bill. The critical acclaim continued for the veteran performer, with Rooney receiving an honorary Academy Award “in recognition of his 60 years of versatility in a variety of memorable film performances.” More recently, he appeared in such films as Night at the Museum (2006) with Ben Stiller, and The Muppets (2011) with Amy Adams and Jason Segel.

Rooney’s personal life, including his frequent trips to the altar, proved to be just as epic as his on-screen performances. His first wife was one of the most beautiful women in Hollywood, actress Ava Gardner. Mickey permanently and legally separated from his eighth wife Jan in June of 2012. In 2011, Rooney filed elder abuse and fraud charges against stepson Christopher Aber and Aber’s wife. At Rooney’s request, the Superior Court issued a restraining order against the Abers, demanding that they stay 100 yards from Rooney, Mickey’s stepson Mark Rooney, and Mark’s wife Charlene. Just prior, Rooney had mustered the strength to break his silence and appeared before the Senate in Washington D.C. telling of his own heartbreaking story of abuse in an effort to live a peaceful, full life and help others who may also be suffering in silence.

Rooney requested through the Superior Court to permanently reside with his son Mark (a musician) and Charlene Rooney (an artist) in the Hollywood Hills. Ironically, after eight failed marriages, he never looked or felt better and finally found happiness in the single life. Rooney passed away April 6, 2014 at the age of 93.

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Biografía de Ingrid Bergman. Famous people in English. Personajes famosos en inglés.

Ingrid Bergman Biography

Famed for her saintly, natural beauty, Ingrid Bergman was the most popular actress of the 1940s; admired equally by audiences and critics, she enjoyed blockbuster after blockbuster — until an unprecedented scandal threatened to destroy her career.

Born August 29, 1915, in Stockholm, Sweden, Bergman was only two years old when her mother died; her father passed on a decade later, and the spinster aunt who had become her guardian perished only a few months after that. Her inheritance allowed her to study at Stockholm’s Royal Dramatic Theatre, and in 1934 she made her screen debut after signing to Svenskfilmindustri with a small role in Munkbrovregen. Bergman’s first lead performance followed a year later in Brunninger, and with the success of the 1936 melodrama Valborgsmassoafen, she rose to become one of Sweden’s biggest stars. Later that year, she starred in the romance Intermezzo, which eventually made its way to New York where it came to the attention of producer David O. Selznick.

After signing a Hollywood contract, she relocated to America where her first film, 1939’s Intermezzo: A Love Story, was an English-language remake of her earlier success.
Bergman’s fresh-scrubbed Nordic beauty set her squarely apart from the stereotypical movie starlet, and quickly both Hollywood executives and audiences became enchanted with her. After briefly returning to Sweden to appear in 1940’s Juninatten, Selznick demanded she return to the U.S., but without any projects immediately available he pointed her to Broadway to star in Liliom. Bergman was next loaned to MGM for 1941’s Adam Had Four Sons, followed by Rage in Heaven. She then appeared against type as a coquettish bad girl in the latest screen adaptation Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. However, it was 1942’s Casablanca which launched her to superstardom; cast opposite Humphrey Bogart after a series of other actresses rejected the picture, she was positively radiant, her chemistry with Bogart the stuff of pure magic. Now a major box-office draw, she won the coveted lead in 1943’s For Whom the Bell Tolls with the blessing of the novel’s author, Ernest Hemingway; when her performance earned an Academy Award nomination, every studio in town wanted to secure her talents.


Bergman next starred in Sam Wood‘s Saratoga Trunk, but because the studio, Warner Bros., wanted to distribute more timely material during wartime, the picture’s release was delayed until 1944. As a result, audiences next saw her in Gaslight, starring opposite Charles Boyer; another rousing success, her performance won Best Actress honors from both the Oscar and Golden Globe voters. The 1945 Spellbound, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, was another massive hit, and a year later they reunited for Notorious. Sandwiched in between was The Bells of St. Mary’s, and all told, the three pictures helped push Bergman to the position of Hollywood’s top female box-office attraction.

Upon fulfilling her contract with Selznick, she began freelancing, starring as a prostitute in 1948’s Arch of Triumph; the public, however, reacted negatively to her decision to play against type, and later that year she was even more saintly than usual as the title heroine in Joan of Arc. Expected to become a blockbuster, the film performed to only moderate success, and after a similarly tepid response to the 1949 Hitchcock thriller Under Capricorn, she began to reconsider her options.
Like so many viewers around the world, Bergman had been highly moved by director Roberto Rossellini‘s Italian neorealist masterpiece Roma Citta Aperta; announcing her desire to work with him, she accepted the lead in 1950’s Stromboli.

During production, Bergman and Rossellini fell in love, and she became pregnant with his child; at the time, she was still married to her first husband, Swedish doctor Peter Lindstrom, and soon she was assailed by criticism the world over. After divorcing Lindstrom, Bergman quickly married Rossellini, but the damage was already done: Stromboli was banned in many markets, boycotted by audiences in others, and despite much curiosity, it was a box-office disaster. Together, over the next six years, the couple made a series of noteworthy films including Europa ’51, Siamo Donne, and Viaggio in Italia, but audiences wanted no part of any of them; to make matters worse, their marriage was crumbling, and their financial resources were exhausted. In 1956, Bergman starred in Jean Renoir‘s lovely Elena et les Hommes, but it too failed to return her to audience favor.


Few stars of Bergman’s magnitude had ever suffered such a sudden and disastrous fall from grace; even fewer enjoyed as remarkable a comeback as the one she mounted with 1957’s Anastasia, a historical tale which not only proved successful with audiences but also with critics, resulting in a second Academy Award. For director Stanley Donen, Bergman next starred in 1958’s Indiscreet, followed by The Inn of the Sixth Happiness. Also in 1958, she married for the third time, to Swedish impresario Lars Schmidt, and when a series of planned projects failed to come to fruition she simply went on sabbatical, appearing in a television presentation of The Turn of the Screw in 1959 but otherwise keeping out of the public eye for three years. She resurfaced in 1961 with Aimez-Vous Brahms? Another three-year hiatus followed prior to her next feature project, The Visit. After 1965’s The Yellow Rolls Royce, Bergman appeared in the 1967 Swedish anthology Stimulantia and then turned to the stage, touring in a production of Eugene O’Neill‘s More Stately Mansions.


Bergman’s theatrical success re-ignited Hollywood’s interest, and Columbia signed her to star in 1969’s hit Cactus Flower; 1970’s Spring Rain followed, before she returned to stage for 1971’s Captain Brassbound’s Conversion. After winning a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her work in 1974’s Murder on the Orient Express, Bergman appeared opposite Liza Minnelli in 1976’s A Matter of Time before returning to Sweden to star in 1978’s superb Herbstsonate, the first and only time she worked with her namesake, the legendary director Ingmar Bergman. After penning a 1980 autobiography, Ingrid Bergman: My Story, in 1982, she starred in the television miniseries A Woman Called Golda, a biography of the Israeli premier Golda Meir; the performance was her last — on August 29 of that year she lost her long battle with cancer. In subsequent years, her daughter, Isabella Rossellini, emerged as a top actress and fashion model.

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Yes, There Are Pale Gardens. Poem by Patrick White. Poesías escogidas en inglés.

Patrick White nació fue un escritor australiano ganador del Premio Nobel de Literatura en 1973 por una narrativa épica y psicológica.

Yes, There Are Pale Gardens – Poem by Patrick White

Yes, there are pale gardens, wings ribbed
like the eyelashes of butterflies, and roses
of flaking blood rooted like something
that was said between the lines of lovers
in a book of fossils in the Burgess Shale.

Even the silence that binds the sacred
to the mundane when the margins of beauty
are feathered by the eyes of peacocks
in the apple green dusk bleeding into mystic blue,

as if one weren’t enough to anticipate
the stars emerging like a gentle rain,
the breath of your lover on the hairs of your arm,
as if the dark were crying through tears of light
from the clouds of unknowing, from
the fathomless watersheds of life and death,

even these tender precipitates of the light
that come on like porches and fireflies
and lamp-posts in this breathless interim
where we neither let things go nor take them in,
nothing born yet of its native waters
and no corpse to wash for burial, neither
prelude to the night, nor epilogue of the day,

even the silence, unliving, undead, unborn, unperishing,
can sometimes seem as dessicated and stale
as the bread and the salt we laid out
on the kitchen table as a feast
to welcome our ghosts back as if they
were the guests for a change, and we
their absent hosts only a threshold away
from revealing the mirage of our own origins
to those who have dismissed us like the wisdom
of old wives’ tales vaguely remembering
the distant legends of our own mythic past
that animated us once like dragons in the dawn
that vowed never to be false to its own beginnings.

So I have not forgotten you like the tattoo
of a starmap inked indelibly on this
paper-thin skin of water like a gravemarker
of the oceans of the moon that have dried up
since the heart has stopped flowing into them
like a waterclock of shadows trying to top off
the overturned hourglasses of better times.

No other place the past has ever lived
but in the specious present, in the same
house of life it was born into and you
have gone on morphing where sacred rivers join
at the meeting place of tribal fires
that have grown brighter over the lightyears
than ghost dancers inspired by the shadows
of things to come out of these penumbral sketches

as I have always done and do like quick studies
of your face since I met you like someone
I would keep on encountering for the rest of my life
in the charcoal and ashes of first magnitude dragons
that still burn like candles beside the beds
we lay down in where we couldn’t tell
if we drowned in the oceans of the rose
like the waves of the vast night sea
that overwhelmed the bodies of our lifeboats
in rogue sunamis, or the flames of desire we were
cremated in prophetically like butterflies
that burned like furnaces in the infernoes
of our mouths as we drifted off like satisfied fire hydrants
into the mindstreams that flowed like rose petals
strewn in the happy gutters of dreams that didn’t
long for anything more than what our arms could hold
of blood and hair and eyelids, lips and breasts,
and the mystic defaults we fell back upon
like the feather pillows of our dishevelled humanity.

No urns, but the kilns have remained hot
as the Pleiades, and the vases we turned
like our bodies back then are still arranging
the constellations like wildflowers that haven’t
shape-shifted into kitchen pots and garden plots
where lovers scatter their ashes on the roots of roses
mummified in bark and burlap, hoping
they’ll make it through another long winter
that drags on like the extinction of spring
in a homely afterlife awaiting the return of everything.

 

Patrick Victor Martindale White nació en Londres, 28 de mayo de 1912-Sídney y murió el 30 de septiembre de 1990. Fue un escritor australiano ganador del Premio Nobel de Literatura en 1973 por una narrativa épica y psicológica, que introdujo la literatura de un nuevo continente en el mundo de las letras.

Desde 1935 hasta su muerte publicó doce novelas, dos libros de cuentos y ocho obras de teatro. Fue también un importante coleccionista de arte moderno australiano y de arte aborigen.

Bibliografía

  • Autobiografía.

    • Flaws in the Glass (Grietas en el espejo), 1981.

  • Novela

    • Happy Valley (El valle feliz), 1939.

    • The Living and the Dead, (La vida y la muerte), 1941.

    • The Aunt’s Story (La historia de la tía), 1948.

    • The Tree of Man (El árbol del hombre), 1955.

    • Voss (Tierra ignota), 1957.

    • Riders in the Chariot, (El carro de los elegidos), 1961.

    • The Solid Mandala (Las esferas del Mandala), 1966.

    • The Vivisector (El vivisector), 1970.

    • The Eye of the Storm (El foco de la tempestad), 1973.

    • Fringe of Leaves (Una orla de hojas), 1976.

    • The Twyborn Affair, (El caso Twyborn), 1980.

    • Memoirs of Many in One, 1986.

  • Poesía

    • Thirteen Poems, 1930 (bajo el pseudónimo Patrick Victor Martindale).

    • The Ploughman and Other Poems, 1935.

  • Relatos cortos

    • The Burnt Ones (Los calcinados), 1964

    • The Cockatoos (Las cacatúas), 1974

    • Three Uneasy Pieces (Tres piezas incómodas), 1988

  • Drama

    • Return to Abyssinia (Regreso a Abyssinia), 1947.

    • Four Plays (Cuatro teatros), 1965.

    • Big Toys, 1978.

    • Signal Driver, 1983.

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Cáceres. Escenario de la serie Juego de Tronos

Juego de Tronos es una de las series más exitosas de los últimos años. Muchas de sus escenas se rodaron en España. Seguimos repasando algunas de esas localizaciones. Hoy le toca el turno a…

 

 

La Ciudad Monumental de Cáceres lucía en todo su esplendor durante el tercer capítulo de la serie convertida en Desembarco del Rey

La Plaza de Santa María (con el Palacio de la Diputación, el de los Golfines de Abajo y la Concatedral al fondo), el Arco de la Estrella y la Cuesta de la Compañía son los escenarios del paseo triunfal protagonizado por Euron Greyjoy con sus prisioneras a su llegada a Desembarco del Rey, ciudad ficticia en la que se convierte la capital cacereña.

Al recinto amurallado, declarado Patrimonio de la Humanidad. El espectador podrá descubrir al ver las imágenes que detrás de la Plaza de Santa María aparece una montaña ficticia, al igual que se ha recreado una torre inexistente junto al Arco de la Estrella y la Torre de los Púlpitos. Al otro lado del arco, junto a la Torre de Bujaco, se erige una fortaleza. Se trata de la Fortaleza Roja, sede del Trono de Hierro y de los reyes de los Siete Reinos.

 

No hay demasiada decoración en las escenas rodadas en la Ciudad Monumental. Pendones con el escudo de la Casa Lannister cuelgan de la fachada del Palacio de Diputación, así como del Arco de la Estrella. Más transformada aparece la Cuesta de la Compañía, que une la Plaza de San Jorge con la de San Mateo. Aquí se puede ver cómo Euron Greyjoy se abre paso bajo la multitud bajo un techo confeccionado con trozos de tela. Lo más reconocible de esta escena, que permite ubicarla en la Cuesta de la Compañía, es la fachada de la Casa de los Becerra, sede la Fundación Mercedes Calles.

 

Por otro lado, en el tramo final del tercer capítulo aparece un castillo que podría identificarse con el de Trujillo, donde la serie también rodó. Sin embargo, la fortaleza pertenece a Almodóvar del Río. Sus almenas en forma de pico son una pista clave para distinguir un castillo de otro. Lo que no plantea dudas es que Los Barruecos serán un gran campo de batalla. Aquí se puede ver a Jaime Lannister acompañado por su inseparable Bronn y por el padre de Sam, Randyll Tarly, además de por un numeroso ejército.

‘Juego de Tronos’ también rodó en la Plaza de las Veletas, que se transformó en la ficción en la ciudad de Antigua. Una imagen nocturna con la iglesia de San Mateo y la Torre de las Cigüeñas al fondo se coló de forma fugaz en el primer capítulo de esta temporada, que se estrenó el pasado 17 de julio, pero aún debe salir en al menos otra escena con personajes como Sam, amigo y consejero de Jon Nieve.

 

Vínculos interesantes:

Cáceres

Plaza de las Veletas

Trujillo

Habla español para conocer España

Adam Levine. “Lost Stars”. Letra en inglés. traducción al español y video. BIOGRAFIA BREVE. DISCOGRAFIA. FOTOS.

Lost Stars es una canción original interpretada por el vocalista de Maroon 5, Adam Levine para la película romántica Begin Again.

“Lost Stars” fue nominada a los Critics Choice Award por Mejor Canción Original y también fue nominada como Mejor Canción Original en los Premios Óscar de 2015.

Video de la Canción “Los Stars” de Adam Levine:

Adam Levine – “Lost Stars”

Please, don’t see
Just a boy caught up in dreams and fantasies
Please, see me
Reaching out for someone I can’t see
Take my hand
Let’s see where we wake up tomorrow
Best-laid plans
Sometimes are just a one-night stand
I’ll be damned
Cupid’s demanding back his arrow
So let’s get drunk on our tears

And God, tell us the reason
Youth is wasted on the young
It’s hunting season
And the lambs are on the run
Searching for meaning
But are we all lost stars
Trying to light up the dark

Who are we?
Just a speck of dust within the galaxy?
Woe is me!
If we’re not careful turns into reality

But don’t you dare
Let our best memories bring you sorrow
Yesterday I saw a lion kiss a deer
Turn the page
Maybe we’ll find a brand new ending
Where we’re dancing in our tears

And God, tell us the reason
Youth is wasted on the young
It’s hunting season
And the lambs are on the run
Searching for meaning
But are we all lost stars
Trying to light up the dark

And I thought I saw you out there crying
And I thought I heard you call my name
And I thought I heard you out there crying
Just the same

And God, give us the reason
Youth is wasted on the young
It’s hunting season
And this lamb is on the run
Searching for meaning
But are we all lost stars
Trying to light up the dark

And I thought I saw you out there crying
And I thought I heard you call my name
And I thought I heard you out there crying

But are we all lost stars
Trying to light up the dark
But are we all lost stars
Trying to light up the dark

Adam Levine, Lost Stars (letra traducida)

Por favor, no veas
solo a un niño atrapado en sueños y fantasías,
por favor, mírame a mí,
tendiendo la mano a alguien que no puedo ver.
Toma mi mano,
vamos a ver dónde nos despertamos mañana.
Los planes más escrupulosamente planeados,
a veces son solo un rollo de una noche.
Yo estaré condenado,
Cupido está reclamando que le devuelva su flecha,
así que emborrachémonos con nuestras lágrimas.

Y Dios, nos cuenta la razón,
por la que la juventud se malgasta en los jóvenes.
Es temporada de caza
y los corderos están a la carrera,
buscando el sentido,
pero todos somos estrellas perdidas,
intentando iluminar la oscuridad.

¿Quiénes somos?
¿solo una mota de polvo en la galaxia?
¡Pobre de mí!
Si no tenemos cuidado se convierte en realidad.

Pero no te atrevas
a dejar que nuestros mejores recuerdos te traigan tristeza.
Ayer, vi a un león besando a un ciervo,
da la vuelta a la página,
quizás encontremos un nuevo final,
en el que bailamos en nuestras lágrimas.

Y Dios, nos cuenta la razón,
por la que la juventud se malgasta en los jóvenes.
Es temporada de caza
y los corderos están a la carrera,
buscando el sentido,
pero todos somos estrellas perdidas,
intentando iluminar la oscuridad.

Y creí verte llorar ahí fuera,
y creí escucharte decir mi nombre,
y creí escucharte ahí fuera, llorando,
exactamente igual.

Y Dios, danos la razón,
por la que la juventud se malgasta en los jóvenes.
Es temporada de caza
y este cordero están a la carrera,
buscando el significado,
pero todos somos estrellas perdidas,
intentando iluminar la oscuridad.

Y creí verte llorar ahí fuera,
y creí escucharte decir mi nombre,
y creí escucharte ahí fuera, llorando.

Pero todos somos estrellas perdidas,
intentando iluminar la oscuridad.
Pero todos somos estrellas perdidas,
intentando iluminar la oscuridad.

Lost Stars es una canción original interpretada por el vocalista de Maroon 5, Adam Levine para la película romántica Begin Again.

“Lost Stars” fue nominada a los Critics Choice Award por Mejor Canción Original y también fue nominada como Mejor Canción Original en los Premios Óscar de 2015.

 

Adam Noah Levine nació en Los Ángeles, California, el 18 de marzo de 1979) es un cantante, compositor, guitarrista y actor estadounidense, especialmente conocido por ser el líder de la banda Maroon 5.

 Actualmente es coach (entrenador) del programa televisivo The Voice.

Está casado desde el 19 de julio de 2014 con la modelo de Victoria´s Secret, Behati Prinsloo.

 

 

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Blackwater Mountain by Charles Wright. Poesías escogidas en inglés. Traducción al español.

Charles Wright, uno de los poetas norteamericanos vivos más importantes. Ganó el premio Pulitzer en 1998 y fue poeta laureado de Estados Unidos 2014-2015.

 

Blackwater Mountain by Charles Wright:

That time of evening, weightless and disparate,

When the loon cries, when the small bass

Jostle the lake’s reflections, when

The green of the oak begins

To open its robes to the dark, the green

Of water to offer itself to the flames,

When lily and lily pad

Husband the last light

Which flares like a white disease, then disappears:

This is what I remember. And this:

The slap of the jacklight on the cove;

The freeze-frame of ducks

Below us; your shots; the wounded flop

And skid of one bird to the thick brush;

The moon of your face in the fire’s glow;

The cold; the darkness. Young,

Wanting approval, what else could I do?

And did, for two hours, waist-deep in the lake,

The thicket as black as death,

Without success or reprieve, try.

The stars over Blackwater Mountain

Still dangle and flash like hooks, and ducks

Coast on the evening water;

The foliage is like applause.

I stand where we stood before and aim

My flashlight down to the lake. A black duck

Explodes to my right, hangs, and is gone.

He shows me the way to you;

He shows me the way to a different fire

Where you, black moon, warm your hands.

Blackwater Mountain por Charles Wright:

A esa hora de la noche, sin peso y dispar,

Cuando el somorgujo llora, cuando la pequeña perca

Impulsa los reflejos del lago, cuando

El verde del roble comienza

a abrir su manto a la oscuridad, el verde

Del agua se ofrecer a las llamas,

Cuando el lirio y la pareja del lirio

manejan la última luz

Que se enciende como una enfermedad blanca, entonces desaparece:

Esto es lo que recuerdo. Y esto:
La bofetada de la luz portátil en la cala;

El fotograma congelado de los patos

bajo nosotros; tus disparos; el descanso herido

Y el patinar de un pájaro por la tupida maleza;

La luna de tu cara en el resplandor del fuego;

El frío; la oscuridad. Joven,

Queriendo la aprobación, ¿qué más podría hacer?

Y lo hizo, durante dos horas, hasta la cintura en el lago,

La espesura tan negra como la muerte

Sin éxito o indulto, inténtalo.
Las estrellas sobre Blackwater Mountain

Todavía cuelgan y destellan como ganchos, y los patos

se deslizan en el agua de la tarde;

El follaje es como un aplauso.

Me quedo donde estábamos parados y apunto

Mi linterna hacia el lago. Un pato negro

vuela a mi derecha, se suspende y se va.

Él me muestra el camino hacia ti;

Él me muestra el camino a un fuego diferente

Donde tú, luna negra, calientas tus manos.

Charles Wright (Tennessee, 1935), uno de los poetas norteamericanos vivos más importantes, es autor de una intensa obra lírica de casi una veintena de títulos.

Ganó el premio Pulitzer en 1998 y fue poeta laureado de Estados Unidos 2014-2015.

Lector apasionado de Dante, traductor de sus pares italianos, cumplió su servicio militar en Italia, y años después regresaría a sostener un extraño encuentro con Ezra Pound –llovía sobre los pórticos de la Plaza de San Marcos, en Venecia; ninguno dijo nada–, en cuyos Cantos encontró un modelo para la estructuración poemática de sus propias divagaciones.

Su obra central es una trilogía compuesta por los libros Country music, The world of the ten thousand things y Negative blue, cada uno conformado a su vez por tres colecciones de poemas. En español conocemos apenas dos de los poemarios del conjunto final, cimas innegables de su producción: Zodiaco negro, publicado por Pre-Textos en 2002 (traducción de Jeannette L. Clariond), y Apalaquia, publicada por El tucán de Virginia en 2003 (traducción de Valerie Mejer y E. M. Test).

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Biografía de Pearl S. Buck. Famous people in English. Personajes famosos en inglés.

Pearl S. Buck Biography and bibliography

Pearl Sydenstricker Buck was born in Hillsboro, West Virginia, on June 26, 1892, to Presbyterian missionary parents. Her family returned to China when she was an infant, and she spent her early years in the city of Zhenjiang.

Buck received her early education from her mother and a Chinese Confucian scholar, later attending missionary schools and a high school in Shanghai. She entered Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in 1910. A philosophy major, she was active in student government and the YWCA and wrote for the college’s literary magazine and yearbook.

Soon after her graduation in 1914, she left again for China, which she considered her true homeland. In 1917, she married John Lossing Buck, an agricultural specialist who was also doing missionary work in China. They lived for several years in North China, then moved in 1921 to Nanjing, where she was one of the first American teachers at Nanjing University and where her daughter Carol was born. In 1927 her family escaped a brutal anti-western attack through the kindness of a Chinese woman whom Buck had befriended.

 

 

Buck was deeply touched by the simplicity and purity of Chinese peasant life and wrote extensively on this subject. In 1931, she published The Good Earth, a novel about the fluctuating fortunes of the peasant family of Wang Lung. For this work, generally considered her masterpiece, she received the Pulitzer Prize in 1932. The Good Earth was followed by two sequels: Sons (1932) and A House Divided (1935). The Exile and Fighting Angel, biographies of her mother and father, followed in 1936 and were singled out for praise by the committee that awarded her the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1938.

She moved permanently to the United States in 1934. In the following year, she divorced Lossing Buck and married her publisher, Richard Walsh. For the remainder of her life, she wrote prolifically, producing a total of more than a hundred works of fiction and non-fiction. Her private life, too, was a full one, as she and Walsh adopted eight children.

She became a prominent advocate of many humanitarian causes. She was a founder of the East and West Association, dedicated to improving understanding between Asian and America. Her experiences as the mother of a retarded child led her to work extensively on behalf of the mentally handicapped and to publish the moving and influential book, The Child Who Never Grew. The plight of Amerasian children, rejected by two worlds, aroused her sympathy as well, and in 1964 she established the Pearl S. Buck Foundation to improve their lives.

She died on March 6, 1973, leaving behind an impressive body of writing and the memory of a life lived in service to tolerance and mutual respect.

Selected bibliography

Autobiographies

  • My Several Worlds: A Personal Record (New York: John Day, 1954).
  • A Bridge For Passing (New York: John Day, 1962)

Biographies

  • The Exile (1936)
  • Fighting Angel (1936)

Novels

See also: List of bestselling novels in the United States in the 1930s

  • East Wind:West Wind (1930)
  • The House of Earth
    • The Good Earth (1931)
    • Sons (1933)
    • A House Divided (1935)
  • The Mother (1933)
  • All Men Are Brothers (1933), a translation of the Chinese classical prose epic Water Margin.
  • This Proud Heart (1938)
  • The Patriot (1939)
  • Other Gods (1940)
  • China Sky (1941)
  • Dragon Seed (1942)
  • The Promise (1943)
  • China Flight (1943)
  • The Townsman (1945) – as John Sedges
  • Portrait of a Marriage (1945)
  • Pavilion of Women (1946)
  • The Angry Wife (1947) – as John Sedges
  • Peony (1948)
  • The Big Wave (1948)
  • The Long Love (1949) – as John Sedges
  • The Bondmaid (1949), first published in Great Britain
  • Kinfolk (1950)
  • God’s Men (1951)
  • The Hidden Flower (1952)
  • Come, My Beloved (1953)
  • Voices in the House (1953) – as John Sedges
  • The Beech Tree (1954) A Children’s story
  • Imperial Woman (1956)
  • Letter from Peking (1957)
  • Command the Morning (1959)
  • Satan Never Sleeps (1962; see 1962 film Satan Never Sleeps)
  • The Living Reed (1963)
  • Death in the Castle (1965)
  • The Time Is Noon (1966)
  • Matthew, Mark, Luke and John (1967)
  • The New Year (1968)
  • The Three Daughters of Madame Liang (1969)
  • Mandala (1970)
  • The Goddess Abides (1972)
  • All Under Heaven (1973)
  • The Rainbow (1974)
  • The Eternal Wonder, (believed to have been written shortly before her death, published in October 2013)

Non-fiction

  • Is There a Case for Foreign Missions? (New York: John Day, 1932).
  • The Chinese Novel: Nobel Lecture Delivered before the Swedish Academy at Stockholm, December 12, 1938 (New York: John Day, 1939).
  • Of Men and Women (1941)
  • What America Means to Me (New York: John Day, 1943). Essays.
  • Talk about Russia (with Masha Scott) (1945)
  • Tell the People: Talks with James Yen About the Mass Education Movement (New York: John Day, 1945).
  • How It Happens: Talk about the German People, 1914–1933, with Erna von Pustau (1947)
  • with Eslanda Goode Robeson. American Argument (New York: John Day, 1949).
  • The Child Who Never Grew (1950)
  • The Man Who Changed China: The Story of Sun Yat-sen (1953)
  • For Spacious Skies (1966)
  • The People of Japan (1966)
  • To My Daughters, With Love (1967)
  • The Kennedy Women (1970)
  • China as I See It (1970)
  • The Story Bible (1971)
  • Pearl S. Buck’s Oriental Cookbook (1972)
  • “Words of Love” (1974)

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